Tagged: nyc

ADHD & Executive Functioning Explained

Posted on June 6, 2014

Retro and Vintage Frightened and Scared Girl ScreamingIf you or a loved one has recently received a diagnosis of ADHD or ADD,  the terms executive functions (EF) or executive functioning deficit may have also surfaced in the conversation. What? If you didn’t understand this term (and who would?), talk with your doctor, psychotherapist, psychologist, or psychiatrist about what this actually means, and how executive functioning may be compromised in individuals with ADHD. The YouTube video (all the way down, at the bottom of this post) offers a clear explanation of executive functioning. It’s helpful to have examples and an understanding of how this problem may show up for you or someone you love in your everyday life, whether you’re a child, adolescent or adult diagnosed with ADHD. This article in Scientific American explains how working with a therapist who practices evidence-based therapies such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or CBT may yield long-term benefits, providing strategies to improve social skills, reduce impulsivity and develop and reinforce positive habits that last. Some individuals find it helpful to work with an expert ADD coach who can help them manage the many aspects of their lives. Parents are reluctant to have their child diagnosed for plenty of good reasons. I get that. However, left untreated, kids with ADD & ADHD are vulnerable to having long-term self-esteem difficulties as well as the potential to abuse substances. Imagine what it’s like to feel overwhelmed, stupid, checked out, revved-up, crazy or as one young adult shared with me recently, “everybody screamed at me all the time, it would have been helpful to have a name for my problem. My friends all got prescriptions for performance enhancement to take the SAT’s, I just wanted to stay awake and focus during the test.” For at-risk kids and adolescents, it really is better to know sooner rather than later. In my opinion, medications such as Ritalin and Adderall are over-prescribed in this country (we now have an epidemic of abuse and addiction). That said, I feel that medication (both stimulant and non-stimulant) is indicated for some and could prove to be life-transforming. Russell Barkley, PhD, clinical professor of psychiatry at the Medical University of South Carolina, is a leading expert on ADHD and the editor of the bimonthly ADHD Report. To learn more about Dr. Barkley and ADHD go to russellbarkley.org.

Click here for more information on kids with ADHD and disrupted executive function from childmind.org.

Practice acceptance, try compassion and change what you can. Take care, KS

Kimberly Seelbrede is a New York City PsychotherapistConsultantEMDR Therapist and Life Coach who specializes in an integrative approach to psychotherapy and coaching, working with adults, adolescents and couples. Kimberly is trained to collaborate with you in developing the insight, self-awareness and coping skills to address many concerns including: relationship, marital difficulties and interpersonal issues, anxiety, depression, panic disorder, obsessions, phobias, self-esteem, self-harm, ADD/ADHD, social difficulties, adolescent challenges, underachievement, perfectionism, identity and sexuality concerns, addictions, compulsions, PTSD, trauma, transitions, bereavement/loss, performance problems, life balance, stress reduction, self-care, women’s issues, purpose, spirituality, recovery support and meditation and mindfulness training. Kimberly specializes in working with high-profile, creative and talented individuals as well as issues unique to successful women. Please email to arrange a consultation in her Manhattan office or inquire about remote/distance sessions using Skype.

Kimberly completed her graduate studies at New York University and has advanced post-graduate psychotherapy certificates from New York University in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and has also received advanced EMDRIA approved EMDR training for trauma resolution as well as specialized training in BrainspottingCognitive-Behavioral Therapy CBTAcceptance and Commitment Therapy ACT,  Dialectical Behavior Therapy DBT Therapy,  MindfulnessNon-Violent Communication (NVC) and studied Life Coaching with ILCT. In her work with couples, she applies the principles of Emotionally Focused Therapy EFT and her relationship training from The Gottman Institute. If you’re a social media enthusiast, you can find Kim Seelbrede on TwitterFacebookLinkedin,Google+Instagram and  Pinterest

Substance Abuse And The Co-Occurrence Of Social Anxiety Disorder

Posted on September 3, 2013

coffee breakShyness and social anxiety is thought by experts to exist on a continuum, however efforts to cope with this anxiety disorder can be disabling for many — leading to avoidance of situations and often using and abusing substances as a solution to manage uncomfortable symptoms. The co-occurrence of substance abuse, particularly alcohol abuse, is common among people who have social anxiety disorder according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Many begin to rely on alcohol, benzodiazepines, pain killers and other mood-altering substances as a coping mechanism to relieve social discomfort. It is, for those with social anxiety, an attempt to solve a problem. While individuals may not experience full relief from their symptoms by using alcohol or drugs, they may experience enough relief to enable them to get through difficult social situations, which then reinforces this particular way of problem solving. Some studies report that the average lifetime prevalence of alcoholism among individuals with social anxiety disorder, as well as depression, may be as high as 20 percent. That’s huge! Psychotherapy such as Cognitive Therapy, DBT skills therapy, mindfulness, ACT and other therapy modalities such as EMDR can help individuals change their thoughts about their circumstances, accept who they are, develop more helpful coping skills and learn to experience greater personal comfort in social situations. Read on to understand what fuels social anxiety and how therapy, and some of the techniques listed can help. To learn more about Social Anxiety Disorder read 6 Ways to Overcome Social Anxiety – Psych Central. To learn more about the link between mood and anxiety disorders and alcoholism and substance use visit ADAA.

Practice acceptance, try compassion and change what you can. KS

Kimberly Seelbrede is a New York City PsychotherapistConsultantEMDR Therapist and Life Coach who specializes in an integrative approach to psychotherapy and coaching, working with adults, adolescents and couples. Kimberly is trained to collaborate with you in developing the insight, self-awareness and coping skills to address many concerns including: relationship, marital difficulties and interpersonal issues, anxiety, depression, panic disorder, obsessions, phobias, self-esteem, self-harm, ADD/ADHD, social difficulties, adolescent challenges, underachievement, perfectionism, identity and sexuality concerns, addictions, compulsions, PTSD, trauma, transitions, bereavement/loss, performance problems, life balance, stress reduction, self-care, women’s issues, purpose, spirituality, recovery support and meditation and mindfulness training. Kimberly specializes in working with high-profile, creative and talented individuals as well as issues unique to successful women. Please email to arrange a consultation in her Manhattan office or inquire about remote/distance sessions using Skype.

Kimberly completed her graduate studies at New York University and has advanced post-graduate psychotherapy certificates from New York University in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and has also received advanced EMDRIA approved EMDR training for trauma resolution as well as specialized training in BrainspottingCognitive-Behavioral Therapy CBTAcceptance and Commitment Therapy ACT,  Dialectical Behavior Therapy DBT Therapy,  MindfulnessNon-Violent Communication (NVC) and studied Life Coaching with ILCT. In her work with couples, she applies the principles of Emotionally Focused Therapy EFT and her relationship training from The Gottman Institute. If you’re a social media enthusiast, you can find Kim Seelbrede on TwitterFacebookLinkedin,Google+Instagram and  Pinterest

 

About Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

Posted on October 4, 2011

As long as a man stands in his own way, everything seems to be in his way. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

Psychodynamic psychotherapy, often called “psychoanalytic” or “dynamic” therapy is based on the premise that past experiences shape the present. According to the psychodynamic therapy model, the way in which an individual solves relationship issues early on can profoundly influence the formation of that individual’s adult personality.

At any early life stage, a person may have become “stuck” in a way of reacting or problem solving that is maladaptive in the present. As an adult, these same limiting patterns and dynamics often play out, getting repeated reflexively and automatically. These patterns interfere with the client’s ability to have healthy, intimate relationships with others as well as demonstrate resilience in the face of rejection. Unresolved development issues can prevent the individual from fully and spontaneously experiencing his or her true feelings which can lead to dissatisfaction in many areas of life such as relationships and career. Despite an individual’s mature exterior and successes in many areas of life, their rigid and repetitive patterns interfere with personal growth and the ability to lead passion-filled, happy lives. Psychodynamic, insight-oriented therapy seeks to make conscious many of these patterns of behaviors that have previously been out of awareness for clients.  There are many schools psychodynamic therapies including: relational analysis, self psychology and object relations therapy.

More about Psychodynamic psychotherapy: It is a form of depth psychology, the primary focus of which is to reveal the unconscious content of a client’s psyche in an effort to alleviate psychic tension. In this way, it is similar to psychoanalysis, but psychodynamic therapy tends to be briefer and less intensive than psychoanalysis. It also relies on the interpersonal relationship between client and therapist more than other forms of depth psychology. In terms of approach, this form of therapy also tends to be more eclectic than others, taking techniques from a variety of sources, rather than relying on a single system of intervention. It is a focus that has been used in individual psychotherapygroup psychotherapyfamily therapy, and to understand and work with institutional and organizational contexts.

Although psychodynamic psychotherapy can take many forms, commonalities include:

  • An emphasis on the centrality of intrapsychic and unconscious conflicts, and their relation to development.
  • Seeing defenses as developing in internal psychic structures in order to avoid unpleasant consequences of conflict.
  • A belief that psychopathology develops especially from early childhood experiences.
  • A view that internal representations of experiences are organized around interpersonal relations.
  • A conviction that life issues and dynamics will re-emerge in the context of the client-therapist relationship as transference and counter-transference.
  • Use of free association as a major method for exploration of internal conflicts and problems.
  • Focusing on interpretations of transference, defense mechanisms, and current symptoms and the working through of these present problems.
  • Trust in insight as critically important for success in therapy.

~Wikipedia

Latest Research in Psychotherapy:

The premier journal in psychology, The American Psychologist, published (February, 2010) an article by University of Colorado researcher Jonathan Shedler, Ph.D. that challenges prevailing thinking about psychotherapy by using multiple sophisticated meta-analyses of psychodynamic therapy and other psychological and pharmacological treatments.  In “The Efficacy of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy,” Shedler states “Empirical evidence supports the efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Effect sizes for psychodynamic psychotherapy are as large as those reported for other therapies that have been actively promoted as “empirically supported” and “evidence based.” Additionally, patients who receive psychodynamic therapy maintain therapeutic gains and appear to continue to improve after treatment ends.” Here is a link to Shedler’s articles and website.

Kimberly Seelbrede is a New York City PsychotherapistConsultantEMDR Therapist and Life Coach who specializes in an integrative approach to psychotherapy and coaching, working with adults, adolescents and couples. Kimberly is trained to collaborate with you in developing the insight, self-awareness and coping skills to address many concerns including: relationship, marital difficulties and interpersonal issues, anxiety, depression, panic disorder, obsessions, phobias, self-esteem, self-harm, ADD/ADHD, social difficulties, adolescent challenges, underachievement, perfectionism, identity and sexuality concerns, addictions, compulsions, PTSD, trauma, transitions, bereavement/loss, performance problems, life balance, stress reduction, self-care, women’s issues, purpose, spirituality, recovery support and meditation and mindfulness training. Kimberly specializes in working with high-profile, creative and talented individuals as well as issues unique to successful women. Please email to arrange a consultation in her Manhattan office or inquire about remote/distance sessions using Skype.

Kimberly completed her graduate studies at New York University and has advanced post-graduate psychotherapy certificates from New York University in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and has also received advanced EMDRIA approved EMDR training for trauma resolution as well as specialized training in BrainspottingCognitive-Behavioral Therapy CBTAcceptance and Commitment Therapy ACT,  Dialectical Behavior Therapy DBT Therapy,  MindfulnessNon-Violent Communication (NVC) and studied Life Coaching with ILCT. In her work with couples, she applies the principles of Emotionally Focused Therapy EFT and her relationship training from The Gottman Institute. If you’re a social media enthusiast, you can find Kim Seelbrede on TwitterFacebookLinkedin,Google+Instagram and Pinterest

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