Tagged: self care

Releasing Into Play And Joy

Posted on June 8, 2014

Close up of pink sneakers worn by a teenager.Help! Your inner child is screaming for you to come and get him or her. What are you waiting for? You’re too busy, yes, I’ve heard that before. But don’t wait for one of life’s wake-up calls to remind you to live. It’s a now or never thing. You don’t want to look back a decade from now and say “I regret not…”

We look but do we always see? We have many responsibilities in our daily lives, but to ignore the beauty in the moment, and to deny our senses pleasure and curiosity is a cruel blow to the soul. Every cell in your being screams for joy –- the question is, can you allow yourself to have it? You eat foods that nourish your body, you exercise to maintain your strength and health, but how are you gifting your spirit? I have a particularly fond memory of working with a dying cancer patient. The purity of her words really hit home for me. In a therapy session, she wanted to meditate and as she opened her eyes, and with astonishing clarity and absolute knowing, she said “every moment is perfect.”  My client knew this truth, and yet we allow our very real and often messy problems of life interfere with our ability to “see” the truth and beauty that is abundant – everywhere – in the smallest of moments and places. If you, like many, have your stuff, and your money, and all the trappings of this material world, but still feel a sinking emptiness — there is a way to help yourself!  If you are mired in the problems of daily life and feel hopeless, you too can find some pleasure – if you allow yourself this gift to the soul. Wake up. How, you may ask? I’ve included some nudges towards joy in this post that may inspire you to seek more play and beauty in the moment, consciously. We are, after all, pleasure-seeking creatures. Discover what really moves you. Find and share yourself! Here’s how:

  • Play - We must take time to fool around, be silly, have fun. We did this as kids why must we give this up?  Find your best childhood moments and surround yourself with people who have a similar playful spirit. Using your imagination even as we get older continues to create new neural pathways. Neural connections are good, brain atrophy, not so good! Your inner child is asking you to join him or her. Play jacks, fingerpaint, make sand angels, do whatever makes your heart sing. Let go.
  • Journaling - The act of recording moments of happiness and gratitude has been shown to enhance the joy factor for many people. What are you grateful for? Recording these moments enhances the experience and makes us better able to pay attention to even more potentially happy moments in the future. Who wouldn’t want to add-in more happiness. The art of journaling about what brings us joy shows us that even simple moments — like the sun streaming in the window on a still dewy day — can trump what we think are the “big” ones. Capture the moments and try gratitude journaling every day.
  • Master a new skill - Frustrating as this may be, learning a new skill makes us happier in the long run. It gives us a sense of mastery and accomplishment which boosts self-esteem. Learning  something new, and the novelty of that experience excites neural pleasure pathways, increasing that feel good dopamine chemical.  Our brain loves neurotransmitters in abundance!
  • Stuff doesn’t make us happy - However investing in new experiences may. We grow tired of our material possessions and they can always be replaced with newer, shinier objects. However, a positive experience remains as good as your memory and has staying power.
  • Nurture with nature - Feel the earth, wiggle your toes, touch the air and grass beneath your feet, breathe the air, sit near water, find the sun, move against the wind, watch the movement of leaves on the trees and study the insects as they busy themselves. Be curious. It’s really quite fun and informative!
  • Discover scent and aromatherapy - Aromatics could be nature’s prozac. Lavender and orange oil reduces stress responses in the nervous system because of a chemical called linalool which alters blood chemistry. I love Young Living Oils and am a Mountain Rose Herb fan. You can research for yourself the many ways that essential oils can nourish your mind and body.
  • Discover the wonders of your body - If you are of able body and have the will,  strengthen your body. I love the practice of yoga now, but do remember the first ten times or so cursing my way through asanas. Now I have not only great respect for the breathing, meditation, purifying and alignment aspects of yoga but I am kick-ass strong. Don’t mess with me! If yoga is not your thing, try kickboxing, strength training, whatever – just move and get strong. Give your body what it needs. Feel your way through it. Gift your body with the awe it deserves
  • Kindness - Practice this. Neuroscientists show that the frontal lobe lights up when we feel and express compassion and kindness. As well, Oxytocin, the hormone that flows when we hug, kiss and feel connected, calms stress and enhances immune function. Touch is an amazing way to ignite compassion in yourself and others. Check out “loving kindness” meditation where we focus on kind thoughts while meditating. Touch someone today!
  • Practice good will and give some stuff away - Give up things that you no longer need. The art of decluttering your life and giving to others feels good. Both aspects of cleansing and nurturing can be healing.
  • A Quick walk to ease tension - I always tell my clients that less can be more, and certainly better than nothing, especially when you’re in a funky little rut.  A small amount of something, such as a ten minute walk, can do wonders to lift the spirit and make it possible for joy to find you. Give up the all or nothing way of thinking — you know — if it’s not an hour-long power walk, it doesn’t count. Faulty thinking.
  • Hire a life coach - Many have success using the help and skill of an expertly trained life coach to help and support with any interference, negative self-talk, resistance. The process gives you accountability, as well as a general kick in the butt during tough times. Changing beliefs, habits and past conditioning as well as moving out of one’s comfort zone is very difficult.  Partnering with a trusted friend, partner or life coach can jump-start you into taking action. Coaching can ask the tough questions that help you find your own answers and brilliance as to why joy, success and movement seems to slip through your fingers!
  • Make  joy-finding a priority - Many of my clients are “joy” deprived — seriously joy-avoidant or feel that they don’t deserve to be happy. Does this old theme or narrative sound familiar?  I often hear “well, if I don’t take things seriously, be vigilant, and toil away, then who will” I then say “that must be such a burden for you!”  Our notion that hyper-vigilance keeps the boat afloat often doesn’t ring true. Things happen whether we stand guard or not. I’m not advocating becoming irresponsible, just lighten your load. Were you raised in a “pro struggle, anti-pleasure environment?”  What do you lose if you give up suffering? Suffering is not virtuous. It’s painful. Say goodbye to your family legacy of “anti joy.” You can learn to let in some light and life, and make room for happiness. The details might just be in the small joys that you encounter when you give yourself permission to see, love, feel, touch and experience. Small steps.

Watch less TV, spend more time with people who bring you joy, get more sleep, clean your house less, play more, sing, dance, write — create your own list of joy-making activities.

Kimberly Seelbrede is a New York City PsychotherapistConsultantEMDR Therapist and Life Coach who specializes in an integrative approach to psychotherapy and coaching, working with adults, adolescents and couples. Kimberly is trained to collaborate with you in developing the insight, self-awareness and coping skills to address many concerns including: relationship, marital difficulties and interpersonal issues, anxiety, depression, panic disorder, obsessions, phobias, self-esteem, self-harm, ADD/ADHD, social difficulties, adolescent challenges, underachievement, perfectionism, identity and sexuality concerns, addictions, compulsions, PTSD, trauma, transitions, bereavement/loss, performance problems, life balance, stress reduction, self-care, women’s issues, purpose, spirituality, recovery support and meditation and mindfulness training. Kimberly specializes in working with high-profile, creative and talented individuals as well as issues unique to successful women. Please email to arrange a consultation in her Manhattan office or inquire about remote/distance sessions using Skype.

Kimberly completed her graduate studies at New York University and has advanced post-graduate psychotherapy certificates from New York University in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and has also received advanced EMDRIA approved EMDR training for trauma resolution as well as specialized training in BrainspottingCognitive-Behavioral Therapy CBTAcceptance and Commitment Therapy ACT,  Dialectical Behavior Therapy DBT Therapy,  MindfulnessNon-Violent Communication (NVC) and studied Life Coaching with ILCT. In her work with couples, she applies the principles of Emotionally Focused Therapy EFT and her relationship training from The Gottman Institute. If you’re a social media enthusiast, you can find Kim Seelbrede on TwitterFacebookLinkedin,Google+Instagram and  Pinterest

Urban Zen Integrative Therapy Program Launches at Omega

Posted on July 3, 2012

(by Kim Seelbrede, originally posted on urbanzen.org)

Are you a yoga instructor looking for a deeper connection to your students as well as your personal practice?  Perhaps like many healthcare professionals, you feel challenged by the demands, both physical and emotional, of caregiving?  This 300-hour advanced training at Omega is a special opportunity for yoga teachers, nurses, doctors, and allied healthcare workers to experience cutting-edge medicine led by some of the nation’s leading instructors. I’m excited to share with you the Urban Zen Integrative Therapy Program, New York Masters Program, which I’ve been honored to participate in as a student, practitioner and mentor. Imagine a health-care system where the patient is treated, not just the disease. A system where complementary healing modalities such as yoga therapy, Reiki, essential oil therapy, nutrition, and contemplative care are integrated fluidly into mainstream medicine in a holistic approach to patient and self-care, creating a sustainable foundation for the health-care system.

In 2009, Donna Karan’s Urban Zen Foundation launched a new program designed to meet this holistic vision. The Urban Zen Integrative Therapy (UZIT) New York Masters Program at Omega offers a 300-hour advanced training program focused on integrating complementary healing modalities into mainstream medical care. During this month long intensive, students are trained in four healing modalities: yoga therapy (in-bed movements, restorative poses, breathwork, and guided body scan meditation), Reiki, essential oil therapy, and contemplative care. Upon completion of the training, 2012 UZIT students are required to complete the traditional 100 hours of clinical rotation experience in order to be assessed and certified as a UZIT practitioner.

No longer a 12-month program, 2012 UZIT students can now take the UZIT Master Program in a four-week, in-residence training at Omega Institute of Rhinebeck, NY.  In this serene environment, nestled in Hudson Valley, UZIT students will be surrounded by nature in the Fall, at its most brilliant. Through innovative educational experiences that awaken the best in the human spirit, Omega provides hope and healing for individuals and society. Surrounded by woods and trails, the UZIT modalities are now shared in an environment that supports deep learning and mindfulness in a tranquil, natural setting. Featuring: Colleen Saidman Yee, Rodney Yee, Robert Chodo Campbell, Koshin Paley Ellison, Tracy Griffiths, Lena Falth, Susan Luck, Richard Freeman, Mary Taylor, Richard Rosen, Ed Dailey, Geoffrey Roniger. Teachers are subject to change. Requirements: Yoga professionals must be 200-hour registered yoga teachers and health-care professionals must have two years of yoga experience. All applicants must have training in first-responder CPR and first aid. Additionally, all applicants must name Urban Zen as insured. Graduates of this first level UZIT program are cleared to begin their 100-hour clinical rotations and final assessment with an UZIT instructor. Application required.

To learn more about the UZIT Master Program at Omega, please visit Omega Online, or use the links provided in this package. Important links to follow this groundbreaking healthcare movement, or to learn more or sign up: Urban Zen Foundation Omega Facebook Yoga Works

Kimberly Seelbrede is a New York City PsychotherapistConsultantEMDR Therapist and Life Coach who specializes in an integrative approach to psychotherapy and coaching, working with adults, adolescents and couples. Kimberly is trained to collaborate with you in developing the insight, self-awareness and coping skills to address many concerns including: relationship, marital difficulties and interpersonal issues, anxiety, depression, panic disorder, obsessions, phobias, self-esteem, self-harm, ADD/ADHD, social difficulties, adolescent challenges, underachievement, perfectionism, identity and sexuality concerns, addictions, compulsions, PTSD, trauma, transitions, bereavement/loss, performance problems, life balance, stress reduction, self-care, women’s issues, purpose, spirituality, recovery support and meditation and mindfulness training. Kimberly specializes in working with high-profile, creative and talented individuals as well as issues unique to successful women. Please email to arrange a consultation in her Manhattan office or inquire about remote/distance sessions using Skype.

Kimberly completed her graduate studies at New York University and has advanced post-graduate psychotherapy certificates from New York University in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and has also received advanced EMDRIA approved EMDR training for trauma resolution as well as specialized training in BrainspottingCognitive-Behavioral Therapy CBTAcceptance and Commitment Therapy ACT,  Dialectical Behavior Therapy DBT Therapy,  MindfulnessNon-Violent Communication (NVC) and studied Life Coaching with ILCT. In her work with couples, she applies the principles of Emotionally Focused Therapy EFT and her relationship training from The Gottman Institute. If you’re a social media enthusiast, you can find Kim Seelbrede on TwitterFacebookLinkedin,Google+Instagram and Pinterest

Nurse Heal Thyself

Posted on January 2, 2012

nsna_blog(by Kim Seelbrede, originally posted on urbanzen.org October 2010)

As snowflakes whispered against the backdrop of the mountains, student nurses from around the country gathered to participate in the 59th annual National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) convention held in Salt Lake City. Urban Zen Integrative Therapy (UZIT) sessions were offered to the student nurses in The Sanctuary, which was generously provided by Johnson & Johnson. This sublime healing space allowed many nurses to experience, for the first time, the exquisite healing modalities offered by the Urban Zen Integrative Therapists. Introducing nurses to the concept of self-care was our mission; powerful, moving and comforting were but a few of the words participants used to describe their restorative sessions.

Maintaining calm in the chaos was no easy feat as hundreds of nurses waited patiently for their sessions. Once inside the soothing environment, students were given permission to “let go and receive” the self-care techniques that are core to the foundation’s philosophy of treating the “whole person.” Weary, tense bodies softened into restful restorative yoga positions as they received Reiki, essential oil therapy and breath awareness techniques.  One student was overheard saying, “You’ve inspired me to take time for myself, to breathe and rest. I didn’t know how to do this.” Another participant softly told her therapist, “I feel blessed to have met you today.  I’m finally able to be ‘in’ my body.”  This speaks to the stress and burnout that over-worked nurses experience.  Many of these natural caretakers have never learned how to connect to their own needs.  Our valued nurses cannot provide care for others when they are depleted.

Nurses are “taught” to care for others and “told” to care for themselves. The Urban Zen Foundation has created a curriculum to “teach” them how.  Nurses are the frontline of healthcare, and for many reasons, the profession is in a crisis. We simply must reach, teach and address the unique needs of this vulnerable profession. We offer our gratitude to Johnson & Johnson and their Campaign for Nursing’s Future (link) for supporting and raising awareness.  To learn more about the Urban Zen Foundation’s commitment to nurses, click here to read about our presence at Kent State.

Kimberly Seelbrede is a New York City PsychotherapistConsultantEMDR Therapist and Life Coach who specializes in an integrative approach to psychotherapy and coaching, working with adults, adolescents and couples. Kimberly is trained to collaborate with you in developing the insight, self-awareness and coping skills to address many concerns including: relationship, marital difficulties and interpersonal issues, anxiety, depression, panic disorder, obsessions, phobias, self-esteem, self-harm, ADD/ADHD, social difficulties, adolescent challenges, underachievement, perfectionism, identity and sexuality concerns, addictions, compulsions, PTSD, trauma, transitions, bereavement/loss, performance problems, life balance, stress reduction, self-care, women’s issues, purpose, spirituality, recovery support and meditation and mindfulness training. Kimberly specializes in working with high-profile, creative and talented individuals as well as issues unique to successful women. Please email to arrange a consultation in her Manhattan office or inquire about remote/distance sessions using Skype. 

Kimberly completed her graduate studies at New York University and has advanced post-graduate psychotherapy certificates from New York University in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and has also received advanced EMDRIA approved EMDR training for trauma resolution as well as specialized training in BrainspottingCognitive-Behavioral Therapy CBTAcceptance and Commitment Therapy ACT,  Dialectical Behavior Therapy DBT Therapy,  MindfulnessNon-Violent Communication (NVC) and studied Life Coaching with ILCT. In her work with couples, she applies the principles of Emotionally Focused Therapy EFT and her relationship training from The Gottman Institute. If you’re a social media enthusiast, you can find Kim Seelbrede on TwitterFacebookLinkedin,Google+Instagram and Pinterest

Self Care, Self Love

Posted on August 5, 2011

AuszeitBeauty is eternity gazing at itself in the mirror but you are eternity and you are the mirror. ~Kahlil Gibran

Many clients come to me when they are, to borrow their words, “a stressed-out mess” or “burned-out and exhausted.” Stress management for busy people is a speciality of mine and an aspect of holistic care that I enjoy adding into therapy sessions with clients. The wellness model of helping a client achieve a satisfying, conscious and joyful life is both practical and elegant, and requires that the process of the body can affect the mind and the process of the mind can affect the body.  In order to keep up with the many demands of our lives, we must make time on a daily basis to replenish and nourish ourselves. It’s called self-care. Many people consider self-care a guilty pleasure or an act of indulgence, but if you reframe it, it’s about refueling so that we can maintain our health and a sense of balance. Small acts of self-care enable us to keep our lives moving along without experiencing depletion or worse, failing health.  Most of us are unbalanced on many levels. Don’t have time you say? I believe a little bit of something is better than nothing. Five minutes of removing yourself from your computer and finding a quiet spot to sit in silence and visualize a calming image can do a world of good.

You, like many, may be the foundation in your life, and when you crumble, everything around you falls apart — sound familiar? Wellness is about taking responsibility and being accountable for your state of health and living consciously. It is working towards the goal of finding a recipe for balance in your life that allows you to fully engage in work, family, relationships and most importantly, your relationship with yourself. If your reserves are depleted, then you cannot work and play at full capacity. Wellness is a choice and making healthier choices is within your control. It is a decision to move toward optimal health and a lifestyle that you design to achieve your highest potential for well being. Like most of us, you just need some guidance and support. It’s difficult to know where to start on your own and even harder staying committed and following through.

How are wellness goals achieved?  If your life is complicated by ongoing stressful conditions, it is best to address these issues and reduce these stressors whenever possible.  When stressful conditions are unavoidable, it often leads to a downward spiral of progressively impaired self-care, at a time when you need your full health and personal strength. When we are in good health, it is important to maintain and support that state of wellness. When we are challenged by difficult situations, it is even more critical to develop a self-care practice that boosts reserves; this practice will fortify you with the resilience and increased energy you need to function during high-stress periods. It is difficult to take the time during a crisis, but so important. So what are a few steps that you can take to keep yourself well during times of stress or a crisis?

  • Find support and learn to ask for help — no shame in this and no need to suffer alone
  • Talk to someone either a trusted friend or therapist — join a support group if necessary
  • Find your determination and decide that you will get through this difficult time
  • Do what you can and focus on one task that will give you a sense of accomplishment — one day at a time
  • Decide what’s important to manage now, and put the other things in a journal or on an imaginary shelf to deal with later
  • Get active by walking, biking, yoga — exercise helps you deal better with stress
  • Remind yourself of your many strengths — write them down if you need to, and look at them often. If you don’t know what you’re good at, ask someone who knows you well
  • Take care of yourself this includes sleep, proper nutrition, rest, play and relaxation
  • Practice breathing consciously — pay attention to shallow breathing

Practitioners of wellness have amazing techniques to help you and most importantly, help you to help heal yourself. Your body is an amazing healing machine. There are natural ways to deal with challenges that include:

  • Relaxation therapy
  • Stress management
  • Psychotherapy
  • Aromatherapy or essential oil treatment
  • Physical exercise or movement
  • Yoga therapy
  • Energy healing and Reiki
  • Focused breathing
  • Hypnotherapy
  • Guided meditation
  • Body focused therapy
  • Holistic health and nutritional guidance
  • Positive life-style changes that affect sleep and energy.

All of these practices are useful in one’s quest for comprehensive health and well-being. In fact, studies suggest that these holistic and psychological practices can increase and promote the body’s natural abilities to heal neurological, endocrine, circulatory, and musculoskeletal and other body systems. Your body was elegantly designed to repair itself when damaged, but you must support and facilitate this process. Make sure that your primary food is healthy relationships — the good ones are supportive and nourishing.

Kimberly Seelbrede is a New York City PsychotherapistConsultantEMDR Therapist and Life Coach who specializes in an integrative approach to psychotherapy and coaching, working with adults, adolescents and couples. Kimberly is trained to collaborate with you in developing the insight, self-awareness and coping skills to address many concerns including: relationship, marital difficulties and interpersonal issues, anxiety, depression, panic disorder, obsessions, phobias, self-esteem, self-harm, ADD/ADHD, social difficulties, adolescent challenges, underachievement, perfectionism, identity and sexuality concerns, addictions, compulsions, PTSD, trauma, transitions, bereavement/loss, performance problems, life balance, stress reduction, self-care, women’s issues, purpose, spirituality, recovery support and meditation and mindfulness training. Kimberly specializes in working with high-profile, creative and talented individuals as well as issues unique to successful women. Please email to arrange a consultation in her Manhattan office or inquire about remote/distance sessions using Skype.

Kimberly completed her graduate studies at New York University and has advanced post-graduate psychotherapy certificates from New York University in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and has also received advanced EMDRIA approved EMDR training for trauma resolution as well as specialized training in BrainspottingCognitive-Behavioral Therapy CBTAcceptance and Commitment Therapy ACT,  Dialectical Behavior Therapy DBT Therapy,  MindfulnessNon-Violent Communication (NVC) and studied Life Coaching with ILCT. In her work with couples, she applies the principles of Emotionally Focused Therapy EFT and her relationship training from The Gottman Institute. If you’re a social media enthusiast, you can find Kim Seelbrede on TwitterFacebookLinkedin,Google+Instagram and  Pinterest

Tapping Towards Healing With EFT

Posted on June 8, 2011

handThe cause of all your negative emotions is a disruption in your body’s energy system

As a therapist with an integrative practice, I endorse teaching as many tools and skills as possible to clients so that they can eventually take control of their own emotional and physical health. Many individuals in their search for psychological wellness are intrigued by non-conventional therapies that may offer profound healing results.  EFT or Emotional Freedom Technique may be one such treatment and can be used alone or in conjunction with psychotherapy. Of all the energy therapies, EFT may be the most widely applied and is easy to learn. Deepak Chopra, MD has said “EFT offers great healing benefits.” Why? It’s simple, effective, long-lasting and empowering — clients can do this treatment on their own, as needed. EFT truly is emotional self-care. 

In my own psychotherapy practice, I can attest to the powerful results of non-conventional treatments such as EMDR and Brainspotting when combined with psychotherapy and especially in the context of a supportive therapeutic relationship. As a stand-alone treatment or with the assistance of a therapist, EFT does deliver amazing results for many.

As the founder of EFT Gary Craig says on his emofree website, “it’s not that EFT is so stunning, rather, it is because conventional healing methods have simply overlooked the obvious.” This is why we say that the Emotional Freedom Techniques are an emotional version of acupuncture, but instead of using needles, we stimulate the well-established energy meridian points on the energy body by tapping them with the fingertips. It is an incredibly gentle technique and you remain relaxed and fully clothed at all times. While the points are being tapped, the recipient focuses on and verbalizes, in a very specific manner, a health condition or emotional issue that they are experiencing. This combination of stimulating the points while focusing on the issue causes changes within the body’s energy system. The process triggers the release of stored emotions or patterns of illness from the body.

We know that electrical messages are constantly sent through your body to keep it informed of what’s going on. Without this natural flow of energy, you would not be able to see, hear, taste, smell or touch. There are some key points where the flow of the body’s energy is more “accessible.” The Chinese have been stimulating these points through touch (acupressure) and needles (acupuncture) for over 5000 years! It’s also from traditional Chinese medicine that we learned about the flow of vital energy (chi or qi) along meridian pathways. Since the tapping points are found on these meridians, Energy Tapping is also known as Meridian Tapping. It has been proven that disruptions or blockages in these electrical pathways can cause limiting thoughts and and trapped emotions. There are plenty of theories on how and why it works, but no one can say for sure.  Scientific studies do show that the electrical resistance in the skin at the meridian acupoints is much lower than the rest of the body and brain wave studies reveal that energy tapping affects the subconscious. However it works, tapping seems to activate our body’s innate self-healing intelligence.

The body is designed to heal itself. Case studies show almost miraculous changes in anxieties, fears, and phobias within minutes. However, most people experience a more gradual shift, with profound insights and tremendous relief accumulating over time.  Energy Tapping also allows us to see our emotions from a new, more empowering perspective. As is the case with many alternative healing techniques such as EMDR, Somatic Experiencing and acupuncture, tapping often gets results when nothing else seems to work. Therapists and medical doctors from all over the world have found EFT to be rapid and profoundly powerful. Albert Einstein told us back in the 1920′s that everything (including our bodies) is composed of energy and Eastern medical experts have known this for over 5,000 years. These ideas have been largely ignored by Western healing practices but are gaining popularity and widely used by many practitioners integrating alternative healing modalities into their work with clients. Experience shows that tapping can shift our beliefs and thoughts quickly and with much less pain than conventional therapies.

To learn more about EFT visit EFT Universe. 

Licensed New York State psychotherapist Kimberly Seelbrede, LCSW has expertise in psychology and the mental health field providing psychotherapy, EMDR, Coaching & Consulting services to adolescents, adults and couples. Her specialities include: mood disorders, anxiety, panic disorder, social anxiety, OCD, postpartum depression, self-esteem, trauma, addictions, self-esteem, loss, transitions, crisis therapy, stress management, pre-marriage and couples therapy, working from a psychodynamic perspective and integrates cutting-edge, mind-body techniques as desired by clients. Kimberly completed her graduate studies at New York University and post-graduate training in psychoanalytic psychotherapy, CBT, DBT Skills, EMDR, life coaching, integrative therapy with the Urban Zen Foundation and couples training with The Gottman Institute. Her private practice is located in New York City and also conducts consultations online or by telephone.

Kimberly’s desire to make a difference beyond her therapy and coaching practice fuels her passion to use the media and continue training in complementary and alternative healthcare practices conducting workshops on health & wellness helping participants learn such skills as avoiding emotional burnout, effective communication, self-care, meditation, breathing techniques, guided imagery, restorative yoga, mindfulness and other helpful mind-body techniques. She enjoys blogging with the hope of sharing helpful information to those who might not otherwise have access to mental health care.